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Why 1 in 3 Adults with Type 2 Diabetes May Have Undetected Cardiovascular Disease

Nov 21, 2023 By Madison Evans

Have you heard that 1 in 3 adults with type 2 diabetes have also developed cardiovascular disease? Yes, it is right, as research indicates. People with diabetes are more prone to heart disease.

Higher blood pressure, high LDL, and low HDL are some factors that cause heart diseases in diabetics. It is also due to the increased level of biomarkers, but that doesn't mean you can't control or avoid it. Improving your lifestyle can save you.

What is Type 2 Diabetes?

In type 2 diabetes Mellitus, the body cannot regulate glucose properly, leading to other heart and immune problems. It is mainly due to two problems. The pancreas does not produce the desired amount of insulin. Or the body cells don't properly respond to insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is more common in older people, also called adult-onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes in women are vaginal thrush, tiredness, blurred vision, and weight loss. The unusual symptoms of diabetes in men and women are dry skin, frequent bathroom visits, and poor healing.

Diabetes and Heart Disease

Research indicates 1 in 3 adults with type 2 diabetes have cardiovascular disease. It also shows that people with type 2 diabetes are more prone to insulin resistance, leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis. It then results in heart attacks.

It is said that increased protein biomarkers are linked to undetected cardiovascular disease in diabetes patients. A study was conducted where blood samples of 10,300 people were collected, and their health data was also noted.

The blood samples examined the increased troponin and n terminal natriuretic peptide levels. They analyzed the data concerning age, income, race, and cardiovascular risk factors. The following results were obtained:

  • About 33.4% of persons who suffered cardiovascular diseases had type 2 diabetes. At the same time, only 16.1% of people showed such signs without diabetes.
  • It was also seen that the increased level of the two protein biomarkers was in the aged people.
  • The troponin levels were also elevated in people having type 2 diabetes for a longer period with poorly controlled sugar levels.

Why Type 2 Diabetics Have Heart Diseases?

Higher blood sugar levels damage the blood vessels and nerves important to control the heart. Type 2 diabetics also have the following conditions which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases:

  • High blood pressure increases the force of blood. Type 2 diabetes and elevated blood pressure increase the chances of cardiovascular diseases up to many folds.
  • High levels of LDL bad cholesterol in the blood form plaque, damaging the artery walls.
  • Also, the high triglycerides and low levels of good cholesterol harden the arteries.

One should note that these conditions don't show symptoms. Other factors contributing to cardiovascular diseases are:

  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Less physical activity
  • Eating a diet high in fats, cholesterol, and salt.

Diagnosing the Heart Diseases

Diagnosis is important for the treatment of a disease. Diabetic patients should get themselves tested and checked for heart disease. You can treat a disease more easily with timely diagnosis.

The medical tests for testing the cardiovascular diseases include:

  • ECG or EKG
  • Echocardiogram
  • Exercise stress test
  • Tests for T and N terminal pro B type natriuretic peptides are important to analyze heart attacks and failures.

Doctors recommend that you also test for the biomarkers level because they are an important cause of heart disease in people with diabetes. So, if you are a type 2 diabetes mellitus patient, you should be careful about your routine checkups.

It is also said that to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetics, we need to target the cholesterol level. You should note that only cholesterol doesn't need to contribute to heart diseases. You can also have a heart disease unrelated to your cholesterol level; in that case, you don't need to manage your cholesterol level.

What Should Diabetics Do?

Patients having type 2 diabetes are more likely to get heart disease due to hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity. Most of the time, cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes is asymptomatic, so they should be more careful.

If you have type 2 diabetes, you should care for your heart to avoid cardiovascular diseases. Here is how you can do this:

  • A healthy diet: people with diabetes should follow a healthy diet. They should avoid processed foods and trans fats. Drinking plenty of water and reducing sugary beverages is appreciated for diabetic patients.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight: people with diabetes should maintain a healthy body weight. If you are obese, you should lose weight to lower the triglycerides and blood sugar levels.
  • Staying active: staying active is important for people with type 2 diabetes. It is because your body becomes more sensitive to insulin when you stay active. In this way, your blood sugar level is controlled, and the risk of cardiovascular diseases is lowered.
  • Managing the ABCs:
  • A: You should regularly check your average blood sugar through an A1C test. Try to maintain the sugar level.
  • B: keep the blood pressure below 140/90 mm Hg per your doctor's advice.
  • C: Managing the Cholesterol levels
  • S: Don't smoke, as it can be lethal if you are a diabetic patient.
  • Less stress: stress raises blood pressure and causes unhealthy habits like overeating. If you are stressed, you should consult professional help to maintain your sugar levels.

Conclusion

Why are people with type 2 diabetes more likely to get heart disease? It can be due to factors like high blood pressure, hardening of arteries, higher LDL, lower HDL, and high levels of triglycerides.

That doesn't mean you can't avoid developing a cardiovascular disease if you are a diabetes patient. You can do it by managing your body weight, eating healthier, staying active, and having less stress.

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